Creative Blogging Ideas for Business

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Why Grammar Nazis Are the Worst

Your angry tweet about a typo was spelled perfectly and had impeccable grammar, but unfortunately you’re an idiot.

I’ve said in the past that blog comments are the quarters in a blogger’s tip jar, but leaving a comment about a typo or grammar is like tipping your waiter with a booger.

Someone who truly cares about grammar, spelling, and human beings in general will email the blogger privately when they spot an error. This is the type of person who wants to help a writer avoid embarrassing themselves, not the type of bully who wants to be the one to do the embarrassing.

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Who’s Really Reading Your Blog?

When most people hear that we “blog” for a living, they think of homespun bloggers posting recipes and ranting about our kids and yoga sessions. No, really, somebody actually said that once.

Personal blogs are great, but in today’s digital environment, blogs are used differently, particularly when used by small businesses and professional service providers. Blogs are now some of the most reliable audience development tools for people who understand how to maximize this wonderful platform.

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Startup Blogs: The Non-Crappy Approach to SEO and Social Media

Illustrated by Sarah Steenland

Let’s be honest … most approaches to search engine optimization (SEO) and social media, when executed by a business, are a little crappy. Spammy, even.

Me, me, me, buy, buy, buy, sign up, sign up, sign up, beta, beta, beta, crap, crap, crap.

There are a few startup gems out there, and we all know who they are, because people adore them: Wistia. Hubspot. Buffer. 37Signals. Moz.

Most often, these gems also have startup blogs. Non-crappy startup blogs, in fact, which makes SEO easy and social media a breeze.

So, let’s talk about why.

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Why Every Startup Should Have a Blog

Illustrated by Sarah Steenland

One of my favorite startup stories is of Scott Heiferman, co-founder and CEO of Meetup. He had carried fancy titles at companies like Sony and never thought he’d be getting into the game of a startup that fostered a local community. That is, until September 11 happened, and he found himself living in New York surrounded by neighbors whom he didn’t know and who didn’t have a good tool to assimilate.

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